If Bail Organa Replaced the Gungans…

Y’all. My imagination goes wild sometimes. After getting some family feedback about the Fixing Jar Jar post, and my Aunt commenting that the idea of Bail Organa replacing the Gungans by sending his army from Alderaan to Tatooine sounded interesting, my mind hit full overdrive, and I immediately had to plan out what that would look like.

What does replacing the Gungans with Organa look like? Let me show you.

First Up – Goodbye Gungans. Jar Jar can stay as comic relief, but he only gets to help out in simple ways. He leads the Jedi immediately to Theed, using his underwater skills to get them into the city without being discovered by the droid army (making him actually useful in a realistic way).

The escape from Naboo, and all of Tattooine remains the same. But things start to really change when our heroes get to Coruscant. We meet Bail Organa along with Chancellor Vallorum and Senator Palpatine when they meet Amidala and the Jedi. Bail has perhaps had past dealings with the Trade Federation acting illegally, so he believes Amidala and supports her.

During the Senate meeting where Amidala is pleading her case, Bail Organa also moves his floating senate seat out to argue for Amidala and immediate action.
Amidala calls for a vote of no confidence in Vallorum like normal. But this time, instead of Chancellor Palpetine’s competition being Ainlee Teem of Malastare and Bail ANTILLES of Alderaan (Organa’s Senatorial predecessor), ORGANA is already the Senator, and now a challenger to Palpatine. Palpatine has the sympathy vote, being from Naboo. But Organa was also elected to the running because of his leadership and being the strongest voice calling the Senate to bring justice on the Trade Federation, who are known to overstep their bounds and have been making a mock of the laws of the Republic.

Amidala, again, decides that she cannot wait for the Senate to argue it out. Organa, wanting to help, convinces his wife (the Queen of Alderaan) to send their army to help. They participate in the diversionary battle, instead of the Gungans.

The Blockade would have to change some, to allow Alderaanian drop ships to get to Naboo. Instead of Blockade ships completely surrounding the planet stopping everyone from getting in and out, perhaps there are a few ships spread out, but mostly their ships are focused on protecting the command center ship (which needs to visually look different from all the other blockade ships) which controls the droid army (this would also give the Naboo pilots and Anakin a clue as to which ship they should focus their attack on. I’m not sure how they actually know which ship to try and attack).

Back on Alderaan, Palpatine is working hard to become Chancellor. We see closed door meetings with other Senators, convincing them to vote for him. He turns Bail’s willingness to help to his own advantage. He convinces other Senators that while Organa’s swift action is for a good cause, his unwillingness to wait for a SENATORIAL vote and SENATORIAL action prove that he would be a dangerous Chancellor. He makes the other Senators fear that Organa would be a threat to their power, that as their leader he would work to strip the Senate of its power and centralize power in the Chancellor seat. This adds a whole new layer of irony, considering this is EXACTLY what Palpatine does.

Ultimately, everything ends happy. Naboo is safe, and their own Senator has been elected chancellor. Naboo and Alderaan (and by extension Amidala and Organa) have formed a lasting bond of friendship.

Episode II – Just give Bail a few more lines, both to show that he and Padme have continued their friendship, and make him a little more overtly against the creation of a Republic Army (which is not hypocritical. He believes in the power of democracy and individual systems to act. He is strongly against centralized power, which would happen if there was an actual Army that belonged to the Republic, controlled by it’s leader).

Episode III – Include the scenes that were cut! There are already 3 or so great scenes of Organa, Padme, and Mon Mothma essentially forming the precursor to the Rebellion. They should have never been taken out, but in this version they need to go back in. And Bail does not adopt Leia simply because he and his wife just so happened to want to adopt a daughter. He adopts and raises Leia in order to honor his beloved friend Padme, just as Obi-Wan accompanies Luke to Tattoine to honor his former apprentice and friend.

What does this achieve, you ask? Let me tell you.

The Gungans are gone. Jar Jar is stomachable, because he is not responsible for the entirely of Naboo. That’s a huge win all by itself. But further than that Bail Organa steps up in a grand way. In the movies themselves, Bail Organa is a secondary character of necessity, since we already know he raises Leia. In the tv shows and Rogue One, he shows himself to be a key player in the Clone Wars and the Rebellion. But we are never quite as attached to him as we should be. With this version?

  • We now know why Organa is such a huge player in the Clone Wars and the Rebellion: He has been in the fight against the Federation/Seperatists/Sith/Empire back from the very beginning.
  • We now understand why Amidala and Organa are friends. He aided her people while she was Queen, and was her mentor when she joined the Senate.
  • We love and respect him all the more as Leia’s father.
  • We learn that Leia’s brashness and willingness to fight come maybe partially from Anakin, but they are also learned at the knee of the amazing man who raised her.
  • The Fall of the Republic becomes more gradual. After Episode I we are left to mourn the fact that the Senate chose Palpatine when they could have chosen Organa. It’s not just that they pick a Sith Lord, the most evil man in the galaxy to lead them. It’s that they don’t chose one of the best and most honorable men in the Senate.
    • Episode I – The Senate chooses evil to lead them instead of good
    • Episode II – The Senate gives the Chancellor emergency powers and an army, choosing war over negotiation and peace, which Amidala and Organa argue for.
    • Episode III – The Senate allows Palpatine to turn the Republic into the Empire.
    • (I personally like this added emphasis on what the Senate does, or chooses not to do. There are more factors at play than just the Jedi and Sith. Yes the Jedi are growing weaker. Yes Palpatine is friggin powerful. But Palpatine does not use force to get what he wants. He uses persuasion and coercion. Which means that ultimately, everyone around him allows him to control their lives.)
  • Bail Organa changes from being a vaguely important secondary character that is frequently used as a useful tool outside the movies, to being one of the strongest and most loved characters. And a character we can love who does not have The Force, but simply the will to create a good galaxy. 

Personally, in my not so humble opinion, I think this is brilliant. Sadly, Hollywood and Lucasfilm don’t ask my opinion. They don’t know what thy are missing  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

Advertisements

Character Analysis: Jar Jar Binks

I know. The last thing anyone wants to read about is Jar Jar Binks. Except that one fan theory that went viral about how he is really a Sith Lord. While it is a compelling argument, and a true masterpiece of thought, I don’t accept it. Obviously I think my own opinions are better. Suppose that’s the nasty thing about opinions. Anyway.
Little does anyone know, my Minor in college was Editing, which does not just include grammar and style, but also fiction editing, and a good deal of what makes characters and story lines work, and what doesn’t. The thing is, Jar Jar truly could have been a FANTASTIC character. Or he could have been comic relief that actually worked, and didn’t make you want to gouge your eyes and ears out. Let me explain.

gungan warGeorge Lucas wanted comic relief. That’s perfectly fine and acceptable.
For the story he wanted to tell, he also needed a fierce warrior race from Naboo to go toe-to-toe with the Trade Federation army. Also perfectly fine and acceptable.
The problem lies in the fact that both roles are fulfilled through the bumbling Jar Jar and the equally ridiculous “warrior” race of the Gungans:

If Lucas wanted comedic relief outside of the droids it could have easily been Jar Jar with very few objections from anybody. He could easily have followed much of the same path: Qui-Gon, being a Jedi sworn to protect those who cannot protect themselves, saves Jar Jar from the droids. Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon cannot shake him off because his gods demand he repays the life debt. Eliminate the Gungans altogether. The end of the story is resolved differently. Either it is a complete stealth mission with no army decoy (unlikely though. As the Star Wars stories developed they settled into each having at least one of each: Lightsaber Fight, Space Battle, and ground battle [originally skirmishes, but become full out war/army scenes]). Or they get an army from somewhere else. The Senate agrees to send some troops. Or they introduce Bail Organa earlier, and he decides to send his own personal army from Alderaan. Along the way, Jar Jar manages to contribute in some small but meaningful fashion. Perhaps in this version he has slicing skills. Or his ability to swim and hold his breath help them get into the palace somehow. Or he takes a blaster bolt for Qui-Gon. Anything really, that is equal to his skills that could discharge his life-debt to Qui-Gon, and perhaps make Amidala grateful enough to make him part of her retinue.
Believe it or not, most of us detractors would accept him in this capacity. It may be hard to believe, because we hate him so vehemently. But if the story were like the above, we never would have grown to hate him so. We’d either like, tolerate, or ignore him, as we do most comic relief in serious movies. This is essentially the same capacity that C-3PO and R2-D2 play in Episode IV. Comic Relief, but provide enough help WITHIN THEIR ABILITY to warrant them actually being there.

OR

Keep the Gungans, but as a truly and decidedly not ridiculous warrior race (maybe like Klingons). Make Jar Jar a great warrior who is shamed that he needed Qui-Gon to save him and is now sworn to repay the life debt to regain his honor among his people. He then leads the rest of his warrior race in a fierce battle against the Trade Federation, not just to help out the humans, but to defend their own land as well. He not only regains his honor, but becomes a hero of both the Gungans and the Naboo, because he forges a lasting peace between the two peoples who have always been at war.
Maybe it’s just me, but I think that would be friggin AWESOME.

If you noticed, both options are very close to the original. Either would work. The problem truly comes from forcing them together. It is simply poor storytelling to ask an audience to ascribe “ridiculous”, “bumbling”, “warrior”, and “hero” to a single character and race, and that is what we are asked to do in “The Phantom Menace”. The contrast is just too far-fetched, and rubs most people the wrong way. Hence the absolute LOATHING of the character.

EwokAs an aside, this is the EXACT reason why a lot of people do not like the Ewoks either. More people do like them than the Gungans simply because they are much cuddlier looking, and more people accept “Cute and Fierce” than “Bumbling and Fierce”. Though not everyone. Hence the sect that hates Ewoks as well.

If anyone has read my other posts, you’ll notice that this opinion appears to be in direct odds with my opinion present in my Character Analysis of Qui-Gon Jinn. In there I defend Jar Jar as a valid character, and one important to the overall story and to Qui-Gon’s decisions. This is because I have two mindsets when I approach discussing Star Wars, or any story, really:
1) Accept all characters and plotlines as valid, intentional, and purposeful, and discuss the story from within the scope of the story. This is what I have done for I think all of my posts so far.
2) Step outside the story itself, and evaluate validity of a character and plot and errors that the storytellers may have made in the creation such things.
I try very hard to keep these two mindsets separate. In this post, I can tear apart Jar Jar form an editor’s perspective, and say what went wrong with the creation of the character and what I would do different. However, if my focus is Qui-Gon, I cannot evaluate Qui-Gon while simultaneously asserting the Jar Jar should be different. I have to adopt the mindset that Jar Jar is how he is on purpose, and is canon that cannot and should not be changed. And if that is the case, I can then evaluate Qui-Gon’s actions towards Jar Jar.
JJBinks

Hopefully that was a little clearer than Tuna Booze Oil.

But what do you think? Would you accept Jar Jar if he was either of the options I presented?

 

Suicide Squad – When a Train Wreck is Still Amazing

I know just about everyone has seen Suicide Squad. Everyone has strong opinions on this movie. So I’m going to throw my opinion and review into the mix.

Synopsis:

Figuring they’re all expendable, a U.S. intelligence officer decides to assemble a team of dangerous, incarcerated supervillains for a top-secret mission. Now armed with government weapons, Deadshot (Will Smith), Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie), Captain Boomerang, Killer Croc and other despicable inmates must learn to work together. Dubbed Task Force X, the criminals unite to battle a mysterious and powerful entity, while the diabolical Joker (Jared Leto) launches an evil agenda of his own.

Rating: PG-13 for sequences of violence and action throughout, disturbing behavior, suggestive content and language.

Excitement Level: Mixed. A part of me was ridiculously excited for this. I love a good anti-hero. Another part of me was super hesitant. I wanted interesting characters and a good story. I was worried that this would be DC’s answer to Deadpool. I know everyone is in love with Deadpool, but it really is not my cup of tea. I do not enjoy crude humor and don’t enjoy violent humor. I am typically ok with violence, so long as there is a point to it. Like in Mad Max. But I am not comfortable or ok with violence becoming a joke. When I found out it wasn’t rated R I decided to give it a chance (I actually wished they had rated it R, but for different reasons than I was worried it would be). I also looked up IMDB parental guide to decide if I would be comfortable watching it or not.

Train Wreck:

The plot is a disaster. Everyone knows this. Here are the two main problems:

1. The Enchantress and her brother are just way too big of villains for the Suicide Squad. Entities so destructive that they cause an entire city on the scale of a New York or Chicago to be evacuated ought to have drawn an actual hero to the scene, like Batman or Flash. I get that Superman is dead and the others tend to be city based, but seriously. This is a huge threat that real heroes would have been drawn in on.
I do get that taking out the Enchantress wasn’t the mission they were assigned. The mission they were assigned was saving Waller at all costs, which yeah, might not have drawn a big superhero. But they were pulled out of their cages before Waller knew that the Enchantress was out of her control. So…
But even if that was their sole purpose in being pulled from their cages, another hero should have been taking care of the Enchantress. So they shouldn’t have needed to “Save the World” as Harley dubbed it.

2. Another issue that we are all well aware of is Deadshot’s weird “Hey, let’s work together and kill Flag” to two minutes later “Harley, if he dies, we all die.”

Unfortunately, neither of these issues were resolved with the new footage from the Extended Cut. But I do have an idea of what they should have done. Obviously, they should have hired me to do editing. But here would be my plan:

Problem 1: They should have never had a villain so big to begin with. But short of re-writing the entire story, they should have cut the scenes so that the rest of the Suicide Squad was not pulled out of their cages and injected until AFTER the Enchantress plan blew up. Then add a few lines of dialogue making it clear that the Squad was NEVER intended to go after the Enchantress, ONLY rescue HBT 1. Could be instigated by one of the SEALS asking if they were being sent to end the “terror” threat (or one of the Squad members complaining about having to end a “terror” threat), to which Flag makes clear that they are going nowhere near the threat, they are JUST a rescue mission, and someone else would be sent for that, but it would take time. But a rescue team needed to be sent ASAP.
This does not completely fix the problem. Only a complete re-write would do that. But it would definately help.

Problem 2: Editing would fix a lot of the problems. However, that editing would also create balance issues. So give and take.
Deadshot needs a motive to change his stance on killing Flag.
The current order of events:

1. Captain Boomerang convinces Slipknot to make a break for it and Slipknot gets his head blown off.
2. Flag threatens Deadshot
3. Deadshot hatches a plan to kill Flag
4. We see attempts at conspiring, and how not well they get along (Extended Footage)
5. Fight with the Enchantress’ army.
6. Flag gets dragged off, Harley is happy because Hey! Now they don’t even need to attack Flag themselves! Except Deadshot points out that if he dies, they all die.
7. Harley steals a purse
8. Flag makes a deal with Deadshot: He keeps the Squad in line, he gets his fresh start (Extended Footage)
9. Flag tells them HBT 1 is at the top of the building, Deadshot asks who they are rescuing, Flag tells him it is none of his business. (EF)
10. Harley has a flashback of trying to convince the Joker to love her (EF)
11. Harley starts psych analyzing, and pissing off, the rest of the Squad. Deadshot asks her to stop. She accuses him of being a rat.
12. Get to the building.

Tex’s Suggested (and Superior) Cut:

1. Captain Boomerang convinces Slipknot to make a break for it and Slipknot gets his head blown off.
2. Flag threatens Deadshot
3. Deadshot hatches a plan to kill Flag. Add in a line about how they have to wait for the right moment.
4. Extended Footage: We see the attempts at conspiring, and how not well they get along.
7. Harley steals a purse
8. Flag makes a deal with Deadshot: He keeps the Squad in line, he gets his fresh start (Extended Footage)
5. Fight with the Enchantress’ army. 
6. Flag gets dragged off, Harley is happy because Hey! Now they don’t even need to attack Flag themselves! Except Deadshot points out that if he dies, they all die.
9. Flag tells them HBT 1 is at the top of the building, Deadshot asks who they are rescuing, Flag tells him it is none of his business. (EF)
10. Harley has a flashback of trying to convince the Joker to love her (EF)
11. Harley starts psych analyzing, and pissing off, the rest of the Squad. Deadshot asks her to stop. She accuses him of being a rat.
12. Get to the building.

Justification for Changes:

Moving Flag and Deadshot’s deal to before the first run in with Enchantress’ Army gives Deadshot a reason to want to defend him. It doesn’t make it perfect. There is still the slight fact that Deadshot didn’t think the bombs in their neck were a problem when he convinced them all to rise up. But at least it gives him a motive to change his mind about it. I would also advocate, among their plans, that a line gets added in that they will need to wait for the right moment. This is important to add in because it now extends the timeline, and it wouldn’t do for the audience to think the characters had forgot about their plan.
The only real problem with my cut would potentially be balance. In an action movie, there has to be a balance between high speed action and slower character development. This might skew that balance to not enough action at the beginning of this sequence, and too much action on the end. But wih the extended footage of Harley’s flashback added, I think it would balance alright. But it would probably not work without the extended footage.

THE CHARACTERS

Characters are the most important part of a movie, in my opinion. I would rather have fascinating characters than a perfect plot, which is why I saw this movie in theaters about 10 times, and bought the Extended Cut as soon as it came out.

Here is my take on the problems with the characters:

Katana – Least Favorite Character. She actually had NO PURPOSE in the movie. I WANTED her to be awesome. I am always on the lookout for girlpower chicks. But she is introduced as being Flag’s bodyguard. And never actually gets a chance to do so. Also, her beckstory stuff came off as annoying angsty, unfortunately.
… Come to think of it though… She would have had more importance, and the original cut would have made more sense… If Katana had been the one to remind Harley that if Flag dies, they all die. Then at least she would be defending Flag by proxy, and Deadshot wouldn’t have had the random change of heart.

Enchantress/Brother – There are a lot of problems with the two of them. They are waaaay too powerful. If she could create an army so easily, why did she need to wait to make her move? She could have created her army to overpower Waller. Also, it really bothers me that she turns people into monsters. She is a Succubus. She Enchants people. It seems to me that her kiss ought to inspire mind control, and people ;become a slave to her will, not physiological change (though I have a feeling that they did that to keep the rating PG-13. It is ok for the Squad to brutally decimate black monsters, not so much humans that bleed.)

Deadshot – Already addressed with his random back and forth of opinion.

Part II – The Amazing

Now that I’ve discussed (and tried to fix) problems, let me discuss what I thought was amazing about the movie.

Characters:

Dr. June Moone – While the Enchantress is a huge problem, I did like what little we saw of June… Which come to think of it was mostly out of her mind fear. She was rightfully terrified of the Enchantress. Most of her lines revolve around “I can’t do that again. Please, don’t make me do this”. She obviously is absolutely terrified, and terrified for herself. Yet she still has the strength to tell the love of her life that if it comes down to it, she is to be sacrificed to take down the Enchantress. True courage shows when we are afraid.

Captain Boomerang – I don’t know why I like him so much. Yet I do. I know his rap sheet says that he has a “fetish for pink unicorns”, like that is just some weird personality quirk. I smell backstory though. It’s gotta be a daughter’s or something similar. By itself it could be. But when Diablo was telling his story about killing his family, the crack in Boomerang’s voice when he asks “and the kids?” makes it sound like there is something personal in his life. I want to know.

Rick Flag  and Deadshot – Flag has a fascinating juxtaposition with Deadshot. Neither of these characters would have been much without each other. Deadshot is the obvious villain: “A serial killer who takes credit cards”. Flag is the obvious hero: “You need real soldiers not these scumbags.” AND YET. Perception of others, and oneself, is a tricky thing. You don’t go into a super-anti-hero movie expecting deep thought to come out of it. But there are important ideas to think about. The thing is, Flag sees himself as the hero and having the moral high ground. He is an American soldier fighting for his country. And looking at himself through that lens, he falls into the trap of believing the ends justify the means, not realizing that this ultimately destroys his moral high ground. He has no problem lying to Deadshot about giving him back has daughter and life. He feels he is in the right, and it’s not like Deadshot is a real person or anything, not like it really matters dangling this man’s daughter like a carrot. And Deadshot believes Flag! Flag doesn’t even stop to realize that only a man who keeps his word and has his own honor would dare believe another man on words alone. Flag definitely has to learn the important lesson that Integrity is blind. You can’t decide to use it when dealing with others you think have it, and turn it off when you think the person you deal with doesn’t matter. Well, I mean you could. But that means you don’t actually have any integrity at all.

Joker and Harley Quinn – Yup, so much is terrible about their relationship. It is abusive and horrible. AND YET. It is so fascinating to watch.

Bonus Thoughts: Jared Leto’s Joker – I know so many people hate him. I love him. I truly do. Is he better than Heath Ledger? No, he is different. AND THAT IS OK. While I don’t profess to read comics, I do know that, at least in video, the Joker is very different in each. And yet still the Joker. Leto’s is different than anything yet (though definite hints of others), and his acting was flawless. I don’t think it was overdone. In fact, I’m not entirely sure it is possible to overdo the Joker. A true crime would be under-doing him, and making him just a bad guy.
On another note, I think I have identified a key component in this Joker (if not Joker in general). I’m sure this is hardly new to comic book buffs. But it seems to me that (this Joker in general) is defined by zero impulse control. Joker is brilliant and powerful. He can put together flawless jobs. But if he randomly has the impulse to use a water gun instead of a real one, he can’t stop himself from doing it. Another man expresses interest in his girl he is curious to see how far that man will take it. If he gets offended the man says no (no matter for what reason), he can’t stop himself from punishing/killing that man. He devises a plan to get rid of the crazy chick obsessed with him. But there is a small part of him that regrets it and realizes he loves her (imma use that term loosely), he cannot stop himself from saving her. No impulse control. Fascinating.

IN CONCLUSION – There is so much that is wrong with this storyline. And yet I love this movie. Because the characters are so dang fascinating, and SO WELL ACTED. Oh, and an awesome soundtrack.

Rey Palpatine. Hear me out.

Here is the truth of it: I am a bit of a hypocrite in that I don’t read other people’s blogs and articles, especially when it comes to Star Wars theories. Pretty much the only one I’ve read is the “Jar Jar is a Sith Lord”, because come on. How could they possibly justify that (though there was some compelling proof). But I thought I would join the Rey debate because why not. However, since I don’t read theories, it is very possible that someone already came up with this exact thought. Ah well.

Rey is not a Skywalker

Originally, I thought for sure they would make Rey a Skywalker, simply because Star Wars is basically the Skywalker Family Drama. I never wanted her to be one; I will be horribly disappointed in the writers if she is. But I figured they would make her one. And that somehow, she and Kylo Ren had a past. Maybe he wiped her memories and dumped her on Jakku instead of slaughtering her because they are cousins. But I now believe there is enough proof pointing elsewhere, and against her being a Skywalker.

Luke was a man who could not bear the thought of facing and killing Vader, simply because Vader is his father. A father he never knew, who committed atrocities throughout the galaxy. A man who destroyed his own daughter’s planet. A man who tortured and killed Luke’s friends. But the family bond is strong. I think it unrealistic that Luke would abandon and wipe the memory of his own daughter. It just doesn’t seem to follow character.

The accent: I get that most people won’t buy this as proof, but I do. Rey has a core-world accent (British). I actually have no idea if it was an accident that Lucas had the Empire speak in British accents, and the Rebellion speak in American (for the most part). But the tradition followed, and more or less developed into Core Worlds = British,  Rim = American. Which is an important distinction, as Obi-Wan, Qui-Gon, Bail Organa, etc are all good guys, but they are at the center of the (political) galaxy: Coruscant, which THEN became the center for the Empire. Notice even Leia has a weird, half-british, half-american accent in episode IV. She was a Senator, after all.
Now, you might be saying Daisly Ridley is British, and therefore she will have a British Accent. Nothing suggestive about it. However. John Boyega is also British. And they had him fake an American Accent. But not Daisy. And everyone associated with the Skywalker family (Anakin, Luke, Leia, Han, Ben/Kylo Ren) all have Rim Accents.

Rey might be a Kenobi

Though I haven’t read any theory posts, it seems this is the fan favorite, and why not? Obi-Wan Kenobi, like the Skywalkers, had been present throughout the saga, and he is an amazing character. And surely he had a life while on Tatooine. But here is the proof that points to Rey Kenobi:

Rey’s Force vision – The fact that we here Obi-Wan’s voice twice, once saying her name, and once saying “These are your first steps”. However, Yoda’s voice can also be heard, and I highly doubt she is a Yoda.

Core Accent – Obi-Wan, like Rey, has a Core World Accent.

My Opinion: Rey is a Palpatine

Maybe this has already been argued. But this is my belief. Core-World accent backs it up. So does the soundtrack. Hear me out.

One day I was contemplating the Emperor’s theme (I contemplate Star Wars a lot), I was humming Emperor Palpatine’s theme to myself when I accidentally switched over to humming Rey’s theme. At first I LOL’d to myself. Then my jaw hit the ground.

I know that John Williams likes to reuse small sections of songs he likes. You can be listening to Star Wars and hear Harry Potter, or Jurassic Park and hear Star Wars. BUT.

Palptine’s theme has been PURPOSELY reused before. The victory celebration at the end of Episode One. After all, while the good guys took a win at the end of the Phantom Menace, Palpatine took an even bigger win. He was named Chancellor, and it was a purposeful decision to hide his theme in the end of Episode 1.

There are definite tones of Palpatine’s theme in Rey’s. Take a listen:
Palpatine’s Theme

Now listen to the choral parts of the victory celebration:
Episode 1 Victory Celebration

Now Rey’s theme:
Rey’s Theme

Also, her super strength in the Force.

And then there is the fact that her first light saber move, a two-handed thrust, is exactly the same as Palpatine’s when he takes out the Jedi come to arrest him. Star Wars definitely creates parallels all throughout the stories for a specific reason. I happen to think this is specifically there for a reason:

thrust-605153

I mean, yeah. Lightsaber moves are not hereditary. But neither are phrases. In Episode III Anakin says “You underestimate my power” and in Episode VI Luke says “Don’t underestimate my power”. In real life this is pure coincidence. In the Star Wars world, this is a purposeful parallel.

***EDIT 10/14/17***
So… The new trailer for Episode 8 just came out.  It is not wise to place too much trust in the Star Wars trailers. After all, the Episode VII trailer tried to make us think Finn was the force sensitive one. The Rogue One trailer was a total mess. I know I totally expected Jyn to ACTUALLY be an extremist (not just have past relations with them), and that she was going to be doing a deep cover mission by joining the Empire to learn about the Death Star. Which totally didn’t happen. And the majority of lines in the trailer never even made it into the movie.
HOWEVER…palpatinevertical_2517
The line that seems to have everyone excited is “I’ve seen this raw strength only once before. It didn’t scare me enough then. It does now”. I know it APPEARS that he is speaking about Kylo Ren. But again, trailers are misleading. What if he is referencing Emperor Palpatine? Luke most definitely underestimated the Emperor’s power.  And that same power might just flow through Rey’s veins. Maybe?
***EDIT***


In Conclusion: 

I really don’t think that Rey is a Skywalker. And imma be super disappointed if she is. Rey as a Kenobi is definitely acceptable. I want Rey to be a Palpatine. Snoke, on the other hand, is a completely new character.

You are going to hear a lot of bragging from me if I’m right. Just Sayin.

Do you agree? Am I crazy? What is your theory? Leave a comment!

Character Analysis: Qui-Gon Jinn

Obi-Wan Kenobi is a boss. No denying that. He is probably my favorite character overall. He killed Darth Maul as an apprentice. Raised, trained, and defeated Anakin Skywalker, the Chosen One — the strongest force user the Jedi had ever seen. The novelization of Episode III, by Mathew Stover, describes him thus:

 This is Obi-Wan Kenobi: A phenomenal pilot who doesn’t like to fly. A devastating warrior who’d rather ot fight. A negotiator whithout peer who frankly prefers to sit alone in a quiet cave and meditate. Jedi Master. General in the Grand Army of the Republic. Member of the Jedi Council… Greatness was never his ambition. He wants only to perform whatever task he is given to the best of his ability. He is respected throughout the Jedi Order for his insight as well as his warrior skill. He has become the hero of the next generation of Padawans; he is the Jedi their Masters hold up as a model. he is the being that the Council assigns to their most important missions. He is modest, centered, and always kind. He is the ultimate Jedi.

All of this is beautifully poetic and completely true of Obi-Wan Kenobi. The problem is, he was considered the ultimate Jedi by the Jedi Order. And the Jedi Order was fallen.

Obi-Wan may have been the perfect Jedi. But Qui-Gon was the last true Jedi.

My favorite question, and the most important question to ask, is WHY?

WHY did an author ad that line? Why did a screenwriter put one scene before another? Why did the actor hesitate? Why did the direct have the camera cut to someone without dialogue just to see their reaction?
In the best stories, there will always be a BECAUSE. I definitely believe there are very clear WHYs and BECAUSEs for Qui-Gon. I will ask those whys and give those becauses.

The easiest thing to see, the first thing any casual movie-goer will see, is that Qui-Gon is always at odds with everyone. Thinking on it, he argues with literally everyone but maybe the Skywalkers (oh come on. We all felt that connection between him and Shmi). Let’s list them just for kicks-

  1. The first exchange between Master and Apprentice.
  2. Various arguments with Obi-Wan over collecting Jar Jar.
  3. Various arguments with Jar Jar, Boss Nass, Various Naboo importantes, and Watto. Have you noticed he never asks for anything? He makes demands.
  4. Arguments with Padme and Obi-Wan about his plan to bet their ship on a 9 year old who has never finished a race before.
  5. Argument with Obi-Wan over bringing Anakin along.
  6. Argument with the Council over the Sith
  7. Argument with the Council… And Obi-Wan… And the Council… And Obi-Wan over whether Anakin should become a Jedi/Chosen one.
  8. Getting the Last Word in: Dying request is binding Obi-Wan to train Anakin, with or without the approval of the council.

For someone known as one of the best diplomats, dude argues with EVERYONE. And never takes no as an answer. In fact… He never actually asks. He makes demands. Or straight up lies. Anything to get the mission done. Well, not so much the mission, but the will of the Force. Perfect Obi-Wan is sitting there trying to convince the Gunguns they need to do the right thing and help The Naboo. Qui-Gon just uses Jedi Mind Trick on the leader of a nation. He tries to do it again to make a merchant accept useless money. He bets the Queen’s Ship on a kid, and doesn’t even think to ask her first. Such tactics hardly seem worthy of the moral Jedi.

Why? There is a reason. But let’s start with Qui-Gon’s behavior from the very beginning in the first important exchange (and argument) of Episode I:
Kenobi – “I have a bad feeling about this”
Jinn – “Really? I don’t sense anything.
K- “It’s not about the mission, Master. Something elsewhere… elusive.
J- “Don’t center on your anxieties, Obi-Wan. Keep your concentration here and now, where it belongs”
K- “But Master Yoda says I should be mindful of the future.”
J – “Be mindful of the Living Force, young padawan”

Looking at this from a first time perspective: In the first important exchange of the movie, Qui-Gon disagrees not only with a young (handsome) Obi-Wan, but also Yoda himself! The only two Jedi we knew of from the Original Trilogy. This is how Episode 1 and this character are introduced to us and the world of Star Wars. Who is this upstart Master that would dare to say the two greatest Jedi (granted, the only Jedi we know) are wrong? Clearly he has no idea who Obi-Wan will become

Looking at this knowing how everything unfolds: The perfect Jedi knew what was going to happen from the beginning! This “diplomatic mission” eventually brought about the Clone Wars, the Fall of the Jedi, and the Rise of the Empire. Maybe if Qui-Gon had let Obi-Wan concentrate on the future a bit more, Obi-Wan could have seen a way to avoid it, right?
Actually…
Some of the most terrible things that happens in the prequels can either be traced back to Qui-Gon winning an argument or Palpatine’s careful scheming.

Let’s take a look at that:

Jar Jar: He’s obnoxious. Even Qui-Gon says he’s brainless. Qui-Gon just Mind Controlled his way out of Gungan punishment. The Trade Federation is attacking the Naboo. Obi-Wan reminds Qui-Gon “Master, we’re short on time.” Yet after a moment of thought he decides they need to take Jar Jar along.
Why?
He might help navigating through the core. Except for the fact that Obi-Wan is driving the Bongo and Qui-Gon knocks Jar Jar out partway in. Was that a mistake on the filmmakers’ part? Well, if you read this post, I’m going off of the assumption that there are no mistakes. So. I’m going to say that Qui-Gon again felt that taking Jar Jar was the Will of the Force. And in Episode I that turned out to be a good thing, because if Padme had never met him, she wouldn’t have thought, or had the connections, to enlist the Gungan Army. So that actually turned out good. But…
Episode II? Well, the only significant thing that Jar Jar does in II is to propose the bill that gives Palpatine Emergency powers. Powers he uses to grip the Senate and Jedi by the throat. Powers he uses to legislate the Clone Army. Which seems like a good thing. Except, oh yeah, the Clones were actually Palpatine’s plan to begin with. A ready made army to ensure that the Republic goes to war, effectively killing all hope of negotiation and a peaceful resolution. A Clone Army just waiting to enact Order 66.
Jeez, Qui-Gon. Shouldn’t have saved Jar Jar’s life back on Naboo.

Anakin. Far and away Qui-Gon’s biggest mistake.
He insisted on using the boy to podrace. Sorry, WHAT?! A 9-year-old boy who has never actually finished a podrace before. They make it out like it’s the only way, but come on. It’s a big planet. Just because Shmii (a slave) doesn’t know anyone friendly to the Republic does not mean that there aren’t pilots and traders around that probably do lots of business with the Republic. And would exchange their money for them. Obi-Wan tries to caution Qui-Gon against it. Padme (really wishing she had her Queen costume) tries to stop Qui-Gon as well. But eh… He knew there was “Something about this boy”. And that was good enough for him.

Didn’t occur to him that the “something” about Anakin was that he might destroy the entire Jedi Order and Republic.
Shoot, the Council knew it. Obi-Wan knew it. “The boy is dangerous, Master. They all sense it, why can’t you?”
Well, according to Qui-Gon, finding Anakin was “The Will of the Force.” Nuff said. Who cares what Obi-Wan thinks. Who cares what the Council thinks. Who cares that the Jedi Code forbids it. He was going to make sure Anakin “The Chosen One” Skywalker became a Jedi if it was the last thing did. Even if it meant tossing aside his current padawan like yesterday’s trash. Even if it meant defying the Council agian. Even if it meant breaking the Jedi Code, which he swore his life to. And in fact, binding Obi-Wan to Anakin was the last thing he did, with his dying breath.
Whoops, Qui-Gon. Shouldn’t have been so bull-headed. Right?

And that argument with the Jedi Council is apparently just another in a long line, according to Obi-Wan:
“Do not defy the council, Master, not again.”
“I shall do what I must, Obi-Wan”
“If you just followed the Code, you would be on the Council”
“You still have much to learn, my young apprentice.”

So what’s his deal? Why is Qui-Gon constantly defying the Council and ignoring the Jedi Code?
He seems to be unique in this. In fact, he is unique in just about every way. The only other Jedi we see ignore the code and defy the council is Anakin, and he was falling to the dark side. Is that Qui-Gon’s problem?
Hardly. He was an utterly devoted Jedi. But different how, and WHY?

He speaks of the Force in an entirely different way than every other Jedi. When Yoda and Obi-Wan are training others in the force* they speak of it like a tool. Use the Force. Let it the Force flow through you.
Qui-Gon? Constantly speaks of being “mindful of the Living Force” and obeying “The will of the Force”. His first lesson to Anakin is about how the Force speaks to them, and how he can hear the will of the Force.

No one else talks about the Force like this! WHY DOES QUI-GON?!?!

BECAUSE

Qui-Gon is the Last True Jedi. He did not care about The Code. He did not care about the approval of the Council. He does not care about the laws and morals of men. He only cares about following the Will of the Living Force.

  • At this point, let me say that if you haven’t read my post about Anakin and the Prophecy, go read that first. I’m not sure how much sense this will make if you don’t know my views on the Jedi Order and the Force. (Long story short is that the Jedi Order was supposed to be the religion of the Light Side of the Force. But after thousands of years in existence its priorities shifted, and it began placing more emphasis on following the Jedi Code and the Council than following the Will of the Living Force.)

All of those great Jedi- Yoda, Obi-Wan, Mace Windu, Plo Kloon, etc.- were not wrong. They legitimately sensed the future Anakin would bring. What they couldn’t sense though, what Qui-Gon did, was that it was the Will of the Force. Anakin WAS the Chosen One. He brought balance exactly as he was supposed to. The Jedi Order turned away from the Will of the Living Force and relied held up the Jedi created Code instead.

The Chosen One brought balance to the Force by destroying both orders. Qui-Gon was the tool that the Living Force used to move the Chosen One into place.

Conclusion:

How do I know I’m right? Well, my midichlorian/Fallen Order theory fits perfectly with my theory on Qui-Gon. But there is one more scrap of proof.

Yoda: “In your solitude on Tattoine, training I have for you. An old friend has learned the path to immortality. One who has returned from the netherworld of the Force. Your old master.”
Obi-Wan: “Qui-Gon!”

This is an incredibly important line that is oft-overlooked as a storytelling device used to shore up gaps and make connections between the prequels and the original trilogy. After all, Yoda, Obi-Wan, and Anakin all come back as Force Ghosts. Why didn’t the Jedi slaughtered in the prequels do this?

So the storytellers decide that someone has to teach them. And Qui-Gon is a name we already know. From the storyteller’s perspective that works, and makes it a relatively insignificant toss in.
But from the STORY perspective? It means that Qui-Gon was right. The man who never sat on the council. Who constantly defied the Code. Who apparently couldn’t sense what every other Jedi could. That man was stronger in the Force than any other who came before him.
Because he was the first to achieve immortality.